Presentation Tips

Wednesday4Women Blog Carnival: “Top Presentation Strategies for Women”

I recently came across an excellent article at TrainingMag.com that explores gender roles in public speaking. To briefly summarize, the author identifies several differences in the way men and women give presentations and how both genders can learn from each other to improve their speaking skills. Although I think there is plenty to learn from the opposite gender, it is documented that women learn better in single-sex groups. That’s one reason why I started my Wednesday4Women blog series, to provide insights, resources and advice from women, about women, for women. The success of this concept has amazed even me.

For this blog carnival, I asked several experts to share their views on “Top Presentations Strategies for Women.” After an overwhelming number of replies, I’ve narrowed it down to the most relevant pieces of advice. The contributors offer spot-on suggestions and include such topics as “How to Ask for What You Want with Confidence” to “Tips for Aspiring Women Speakers” to “5 Presentation Tips to Wow Your Audience.” You’ll also find information from websites listed on Forbes’ “Top 100 Websites for Women.”

I highly recommend you spend time reading these golden nuggets of wisdom and learning more about each of our talented contributors. They have a lot of valuable information to share. Enjoy!

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Savvy Speaks: Top Presentation Strategies for Women Savvy Sisters - Savvy B2B Marketing Great advice to help women play to their natural communication skills.

Top Presentation Strategies for Women Emily Jasper – From the Gen Y Perspective A handful of tips women may use to help improve their presentation skills.

5 Top Tips for Aspiring Women Speakers Susan Macauley – Amazing Women Rock/Unleash Amazing You Advice for you to feel more comfortable, confident and in control when you speak. (Can also be found here.)

How To Ask For What You Want With Confidence Brenda Solano – Hybrid Mom Have you noticed how you can speak with complete authority at home, but when it comes to business you sometimes lose your voice?

5 Presentation Tips to Wow Your Audience Christie Cruz – Career Advisor for Global Young Professionals Strategies that can help you overcome your presentation fears and “wow” your audience.

Top Presentation Strategies for Women Mark Grimm - Story-of-the-Day Blog Important presentation principles to help you bring home your message in a clear, compelling way.

Be Original Like Temple Grandin Deborah Taylor-French - Dog Leader Mysteries Temple Grandin, one of Time Magazine’s “100 most influential people,” exemplifies original communication.

Top Presentation Strategies for Women Joanne O. McGhee – Sage ELT, LLC Presenting in front of a group whether, it is small or large can be both exhilarating and intimidating.

Top Presentation Strategies Katherine Winkelman – Gioia Company, LLC Presentation tips from the perspective of a small business owner.

Top Presentation Strategies Nancy Longo - Longo Job Explorer Important communications advice from an award winning journalist.

Speaking Engagement? Wear this! Margaret Lawrence - Naracamicie One of our favorite San Francisco stores enlightens us on what to wear for our next presentation.

 

Presentation Strategies for Women Lisa Braithwaite – Speak Schmeak Why do we single out women as needing special advice?

Where is your Mommy Voice? David Rosman – InkandVoice Communication Unfortunately, many women seem to lose their "Mommy Voice" when giving a presentation.

Cracking the Presentation Glass Ceiling Kathy Reifferstein - And...Now Presenting! Women must overcome some unique challenges to maximize their impact as speakers.

This blog carnival is a special edition of my Wednesday4Women blog series, where I feature stories, resources and information to help women gain greater influence, power, and confidence in their professional and personal life. Please enjoy these weekly Wednesday blogs and forward them to the powerful women in your life. I appreciate your insightful comments and suggestions for future blog carnivals. A special thanks to all our bloggers and to you, our readers.

Use the Pareto Principle for More Powerful Presentations

ParetoThe 80/20 Rule, also known as the Pareto Principle, helps explain the power of simplicity. The 80/20 Rule is pervasive in our world. For example:

  • 80% of traffic jams occur on the 20% of roads
  • 80% of beer is consumed by 20% of drinkers
  • 80% of profits come from 20% of customers
  • 80% of sales are generated by 20% of sales people
  • In other words, for many events, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

Named after Italian economist Vilfredo Pareto, who observed in 1906 that 80% of the land in Italy was owned by 20% of the population, the Pareto Principle can be seen in all areas of life. From traffic to beer to business and everywhere in between, the 80/20 Rule dominates. And, believe it or not, the 80/20 Rule applies to your presentations too.

First, it’s important to note that the point of the 80/20 Rule is to help you realize that most things in life are not evenly distributed, including your time resources. But when you recognize which 20% of something gives you the most reward or return on investment, you can make a conscious decision to focus on those aspects.

So when it comes to your presentations, here’s how the 80/20 Rule comes into play:

  • Your content – Most presenters struggle with content creation because they don’t know how to focus their main points. As such, they try to put everything they know about the topic into a short presentation. But using the Pareto Principle, you can see that 80% of your results will come from 20% of your content; therefore, focus on the vital few pieces of information—the 20%—that will be most important for your listeners. Don’t rely on your instincts to identify the 20%. Instead, use data to determine the truth about what to put in your speech. Analyze your audience and look at who they are. What are their pains? What problems do they need to solve? What will help them be less overwhelmed, more organized, more successful? Then, focus just on those few items and give 80% of your content around those 20% of main points. Remember, keeping your message simple keeps both you and your audience focused.
  • Body Language – We all have dozens of gestures and body language tools available to us, but most people use only about 20% of what they have in their toolbox. This is not necessarily a bad thing, as it does simplify the options. However, using the same old 20% of body language all the time could be boring for you and your audience. Think of it like wearing the same pair of shoes every day. They work, but the “wow” factor is gone. So rather than using the same 20% of gestures and body language 80% of the time, try out a few new hand movements, facial expressions, and even body stances. You may just find that they open you up to a whole new realm of possibilities.
  • Vocabulary – The Oxford English Dictionary contains full entries for 171,476 words in current use, and 47,156 obsolete words. To this may be added around 9,500 derivative words included as subentries. This suggests that there are, at the very least, a quarter of a million distinct English words, excluding inflections and words from technical and regional vocabulary not covered by the OED, or words not yet added to the published dictionary, of which perhaps 20% are no longer in current use. If all these were counted, the total would probably approach three quarters of a million words. Even though we can choose to use any of these words in our presentations, the fact is that 80% of the time we use the same 20% of words in our presentations. If this works for you and delivers stellar results, then great. But if you’re looking for better results from your presentations, perhaps it’s time to stretch your mind, learn new words, and expand your vocabulary.

Finally, the Pareto Principle does not mean you can ignore key aspects of your presentation (or key aspects of anything for that matter). So while you may create 80% of your presentation in the first 20% of time, or you may focus on 20% of your key points for 80% of the time, you still need to add in the details that turn your ho-hum first draft into a high caliber presentation.

Will you take these steps? I already know what 80% of the people will. The real question is, what will YOU do?