Top Tech Tools to Build Audience Engagement

Imagine knowing your audience members’ questions while you’re speaking and being able to address them on the spot, before the Q&A. Imagine getting a better “read” on what your listeners are thinking or understanding about your topic and not having to solely rely on their non-verbal cues, which may not always be accurate. Imagine having an audience truly engaged from your first word to your last, because you know without a doubt that you’re delivering the information they find most useful.

The good news is that today’s technology tools can help you do that—while you’re speaking in real time. While some people may think that having technology front and center during a presentation (aside from PowerPoint™) would be too distracting and hard to manage, there are technology tools that make engagement much easier. Here are the three to consider using for your next presentation.

  • Twitter. For years, we’ve all heard the request made before important or main stage presentations: “Please turn off your phones.” These days, however, more and more speakers are instead saying, “Please take out your smart phone and turn it ON. Go to your Twitter app and tweet me your questions during the presentation. I’ll monitor it from up here and answers any questions I can in real time.” You can even make a special hashtag phrase that relates to your presentation to make monitoring easy. This low-tech technology approach is simple for audience members (most probably already have Twitter on their smart phone), and those who don’t can follow along and still ask questions by logging into a Twitter conversation tool like Twubs. Don’t like or use Twitter? Just have people text you their questions in real time.
  • Audience Response Systems. At the other end of the technology spectrum are Audience Response Systems (ARS). These are hardware and/or software technologies that audience members use to give feedback in real time. If you’ve ever taken part in polling during a presentation, where you received a gadget and then pushed a button to enter your response, you’ve used an ARS. Of course, ARS tools have evolved over the years and come in all shapes and sizes and do much more than simple polling. To get an idea of what ARS offers these days, check out Turning Technologies.
  • Apps. Need more audience engagement? Yes, there’s an app for that! One I recently learned of is called Join Speaker. What’s nice about apps is that they don’t require a special device like an ARS does. Rather, the attendees use the browser on their smart phone or tablet, enter your unique URL, and then interact with you, sharing input (questions, comments, or ideas) and even voting on other audience members’ input.

Of course, no technology can replace the essentials for audience engagement, such as using gestures, making eye contact, speaking with passion, and practicing your presentation so it sounds natural. Those are the timeless techniques that will never go out of style and are vital to your foundational skills. But still, it’s nice to know that technology can help with the engagement factor and actually encourage input and participation. When used wisely, today’s technology can positively impact your audience’s experience.